Tibetan Mustang: A Cultural Renaissance

Luigi Fieni, Kenneth Parker
книга Tibetan Mustang: A Cultural Renaissance, автор: Luigi Fieni, Kenneth Parker

посмотреть все 17 фото

Tibetan Mustang: A Cultural Renaissance

Luigi Fieni, Kenneth Parker
Цена: 3500 грн
Есть в наличии
ID: 16736
Издательство: Hirmer
Переплёт: Hardcover, 27.9 x 35.6 cm
Количество страниц: 248; colour illustrations: 180
Год издания: 2023
Язык: English
ISBN-13: 9783777441979

Tibetan culture revives in hidden Himalayan kingdom.

Photographers Luigi Fieni and Kenneth Parker document the cultural revival of Tibetan Mustang “the hidden kingdom” of the Himalayas. A restoration project of its sacred temple murals directed by Luigi Fieni over more than 20 years has reawakened Buddhist traditions. Included is Mustang’s extraordinary landscape as well as the Lobas’ spiritual and secular way of life.

The kingdom of Mustang, where Tibetan Buddhist tradition continues, is emerging as a beacon of community-directed art conservation and resurgent culture. Sacred temples dominate the medieval capital Lo Monthang. Following centuries of deterioration a mural restoration project has taken place over more then 20 years, directed by conservator/photographer Luigi Fieni. This included training the unskilled Lobas in Western conservation methods. This extraordinary initiative led to a vibrant cultural renaissance in the kingdom.

About the Authors:

Luigi Fieni is the lead art conservator and photographer of the Mustang project. His works restoring ancient Buddhist art across Asia have been published and exhibited worldwide.
Kenneth Parker is a large-format photographer, working principally in remote areas, producing a body of work in traditional film format which have been, widely exhibited and published.
Amy Heller is a Tibetologist and art historian who teaches at University of Bern, Institute for the Science of Religion and who writes on Tibetan art and culture.
HH Sakya Trichen is the revered forty-first throne holder of the Sakya school of Tibetan Buddhism dating back to 1073, one of the four main traditions of Tibetan Buddhism.